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Compiled by Will Spitz and Regis Ahern
thursday | friday | saturday | sunday | monday | tuesday | wednesday | thursday

THURSDAY 12

ROCK

SUNBURNED HAND OF THE MAN are - well, what are they? A pulsating octopoidal group mind experiencing itself fearlessly through music and woolly hats? A collective of shifting numbers and multi-instrumental abilities working out of a Charlestown warehouse who begin each show and recording session in a state of absolute musical virginity and radiant cluelessness? Well, yeah. The basic sound is something rattled and compulsive, a drifting freak-funk panic attack within which any amount of digression or fixation is permitted. For 10 minutes, they might sound like the Boredoms with Jah Wobble on bass, before drifting into a netherworld of chants, feedback, and shockwaves without origin. It's all improvised, it's all spontaneous. Get burnt tonight at P.A.'s Lounge, 345 Somerville Ave, Somerville | 617.776.1557.

On his ode to ubiquitous bass-playing rocker girl Michelle Paulhus and her former band the Decals, "I Like Her Band," the MODIFIERS' Chris Perry claims that "if she comes to a show I'm going to play it for her like it's my last time." Well, tonight might be a good time to check out the 'Mats-loving, college-rocking trio, since they're playing at Paulhus's place of employment, the Abbey Lounge, 3 Beacon St, Somerville | 617.441.9631.

The apple doesn't fall far from the tree - it's a cliché that rings true in the case of acclaimed father-son singer-songwriters Dennis and JAKE BRENNAN. On the heels of daddy Dennis's December residency at Lizard Lounge, young Jake follows in his father's footsteps with a residency of his own this month at the Cambridge club. Tonight, the second of four Thursday-night shows, he's joined by the inimitable RUDDS and Frank Smith frontman AARON SINCLAIR. Given the collective nature of Sinclair's stellar alt-countryish outfit, don't be surprised if some friends show up to lend a hand | 1667 Mass Ave, Cambridge | 617.547.0759.

In just a half-dozen years, MARAH have been courted and signed by Steve Earle to his E Squared label, earned a studio visit (and cameo) from Springsteen, and moved from Philly to Brooklyn, where they started over last year by releasing two albums on Yep Rock: A Christmas Kind of Town and If You Didn't Laugh You'd Cry. (See "Download") Along the way, brothers Dave and Serge Bielanko have garnered all kinds of critical praise even as that major commercial breakthrough has remained elusive. The upside is you can still catch one of the best American rock-and-roll bands at relatively intimate clubs like T.T. the Bear's Place, where they'll be tonight with ADAM & DAVE'S BLOODLINE and GOLDEN WEST MOTOR LODGE | 10 Brookline St, Cambridge | 617.492.BEAR.

INDIE

Lot Six frontman Dave Vicini spent a good portion of the past month or so holed up in his bedroom with some instruments, some drugs, and a computer. The results (which are available for free download at myspace.com/daviscavis) sound like a lo-fi imagination of the weirder, quieter side of TL6. In other words, very awesome. A few weeks ago, Vicini recruited a couple of his comrades - fellow Lot Sixer Dan Burke and Dirty Holiday's Tommy James - to play with him under the moniker BEAT AWFULS, and after just two practices, they made their debut at the Other Side Café. They play their second-ever show tonight at ZuZu, 474 Mass Ave, Cambridge | 617.864.3278.

BOOKS

Blogging is everywhere, so it isn't a surprise that a blogger has blogged her way to a book. ANA MARIE COX, the Washington (DC) blogger known as Wonkette, has written a fictive political work, Dog Days, that bears a strong resemblance to the 2004 presidential election. Unintentional, we're sure. Dog Days then gets into "paid sexual dalliances with elected officials" - which is a fancy name for pols using hookers. It's a dirty world down there in DC, and we love to hear about it. She's at the Brookline Booksmith, 279 Harvard Ave | 7 pm | free | 617.566.6660.

THEATER

Boston performance artist Diane Edgecomb is best known for the Millennium Labyrinth Project, in which giant masked figures from the myth of Ariadne roamed the MBTA. She has a new project, RESTRAINTS, in the works for three years, that makes its debut tonight. Influenced by the work of Polish theater guru Jerzy Grotowski, with whose disciples Edgecomb has studied, it's "an imagistic journey exploring the boundaries of madness and religious zeal." There are some? The solo performance piece continues through January 29 at Charlestown Working Theater, 442 Bunker Hill St, Charlestown | $18 | 617.242.3285 or www.charlestownworkingtheater.org.

CLASSICAL

If JAMES LEVINE and the BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA made a New Year's resolution to throttle back on the goodie-stuffed programs, it's already out the window. This weekend's show starts with the world premiere of yet another BSO commission, Jonathan Dawe's The Flowering Arts (standing in for the originally announced BSO-commissioned world premiere by Leon Kirchner, which didn't get done in time). It's followed by Robert Schumann's one-movement Symphony No. 4, which is actually his second symphony except that he withdrew it and rewrote it so you'd have an intermission opportunity to argue about which version is better and whether Jimmy and company played the right one. After intermission, we get Hector Berlioz's romantic opium dream (no, "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" was not the first), the Symphonie fantastique, with more discussion opportunities, like the optional cornets in the waltz movement. Symphony Hall is at 301 Mass Ave, Boston | January 12 @ 8 pm; January 13 @ 1:30 pm; January 14 + 17 @ 8 pm | $28-$108 | 617.266.1200 or www.bso.org.

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FRIDAY 13
Paolo

CLASSICAL

The first time he appeared at the Boston Early Music Festival, Italian viola da gambist PAOLO PANDOLFO "knocked everyone's socks off," as our own classical-music scribe, Lloyd Schwartz, reported. Paolo makes his first Boston appearance in three years with a solo recital featuring arrangements of Bach sonatas for his unique instrument, which the cello has eclipsed but not superseded, as he and fellow gambist Jordi Savall have amply demonstrated. He's at the First Congregational Church in Cambridge, 11 Garden St | 8 pm [free pre-concert talk at 6:30 pm] | $21-$53 | 617.661.1812 or www.bemf.org.

FILM

The best film released in 2005 was made 30 years ago. In case you missed the brief re-release of Michelangelo Antonioni's The Passenger, in which Jack Nicholson plays a journalist who takes on the identity of a dead man, the Brattle Theatre is bringing it back this weekend to open its "ANTONIONI X 4" retrospective. The Brattle is at 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | 617.876.6837.

Opening today in theaters: CACHÉ|HIDDEN, GLORY ROAD, HOODWINKED, LAST HOLIDAY, MRS. HENDSERSON PRESENTS, NAKED IN ASHES, TRISTAN & ISOLDE, and THE WHITE COUNTESS

COMEDY

Rudy Ray Moore's a chitlin-circuit jack-of-all-trades: comedian, musician, dispenser of dirty dozens, filmmaker and, most important, pimpin' superhero in his legendary DOLEMITE persona. If you haven't seen a Dolemite flick, you don't know how bad bad-ass gets. Learn how much Quentin Tarantino has copped from this foul-mouthed, karate choppin', lover-swappin' kingpin when Moore makes a rare local appearance performing in conjunction with the screening of the Dolemite movie The Human Tornado at the Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St, Brookline | midnight | $15 | 617.734.2501.

CLASSICAL

Time off for the HANDEL AND HAYDN SOCIETY after giving us two programs in December? Not exactly. Music director GRANT LLEWELLYN and company are back this weekend with "music's most famous four-note theme," which would be the one that begins Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. On Friday and Sunday, they'll be joined by Australian violinist RICHARD TOGNETTI for Beethoven's Violin Concerto, the one with the theme to which you can sing "Don't play chess with your daughter/She knows more than you taught her," but preferably not while Richard is playing. On Saturday, Harvard professor THOMAS FORREST KELLY will join Llewellyn on stage on an extended pre-performance discussion of the composer's life and his symphony. That's at Symphony Hall, 301 Mass Ave, Boston | January 13 @ 8 pm; January 14-15 @ 3 pm | $15-$63 | 617.266.3605 or www.handelandhaydn.org.

ALT ROCK

If you weren't able to get tickets to tonight's Rolling Stones concert (the first of a sold-out two-night stand at the TD Banknorth Garden) or you just couldn't rationalize plunking down a week's pay to watch a group of grotesquely wealthy senior citizens in leather pants play songs they wrote decades ago, don't fret - there are plenty of other options. For starters, '80s college-rock heroes CAMPER VAN BEETHOVEN, who got back together in 2000, bring their still-going-strong reunion to town. The band once proposed a way to mellow out the Oi! boys with a song called "Take the Skinheads Bowling," and now they're aiming to chill the fundamentalists by getting them to battle aliens and blow up a disco on New Roman Times (Pitch-A-Tent), their first proper album since 1989's Key Lime Pie. That gambit probably won't work, but we can hear their case downstairs at the Middle East, where the openers are alt-bluegrassers TRAMPLED BY TURTLES, which sounds like a slow, painful way to go | 480 Mass Ave, Cambridge | 617.864.EAST.

WORLD

The Tuvan quartet HUUN HUUR TU remain one of the most exotic ensembles on the planet despite producing sounds that have found their way into the music of Frank Zappa, the Chieftains, the Kronos Quartet, and Johnny "Guitar" Watson, not to mention the Bulgarian Women's Choir. Hailing from the former Soviet republic of Tuva, which borders Mongolia, these four prairie horseman have mastered the art of "throat singing" - producing simultaneous multiple pitches, a technique also favored by Tibetan monks - and they use it in their own mystical, nature-loving folk music, which these days has taken on more of a Western cast | Somerville Theatre, 55 Davis Square, Somerville | 8 pm | $21-$27 | 617.931.2000.

JAZZ

Chicago saxophone terror KEN VANDERMARK joins Boston-based pianist PANDELIS KARAYORGIS for a duo performance at Zeitgeist Gallery; solo violinist KATT HERNANDEZ opens | 1353 Cambridge St, Cambridge | 617.876.6060.

POP

IMOGEN HEAP at the Paradise, Boston. Read Sarah Tomlinson's review of Speak For Yourself here.

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SATURDAY 14

INDIE

All it took was a little indie EP - last year's dream-poppy Sleep Late for a Better Tomorrow (North Street), with its boy/girl vocals and swirling melodies - and DIRTY ON PURPOSE were already being touted as the next big Brooklyn thing. We'll find out whether they can live up to the hype when they release their debut full-length this spring. In the meantime, they're back in Boston to play Great Scott with APPOMATTOX and GRAMMAR DEBATE | 1222 Comm Ave, Allston | 617.734.4502.

JAZZ

A renowned monster on his instrument even before emerging with Miles Davis's band in the mid '80s, alto-saxophonist KENNY GARRETT comes to the Regattabar with pianist CARLOS MCKINNEY, bassist KRIS FUNN, and drummer RONALD BRUNER for shows tonight and tomorrow | Charles Hotel, 1 Bennett St, Cambridge | 617.395.7757.

FILM

The best film released in 2005 was made 30 years ago. In case you missed the brief re-release of Michelangelo Antonioni's The Passenger, in which Jack Nicholson plays a journalist who takes on the identity of a dead man, the Brattle Theatre is bringing it back this weekend to open its "ANTONIONI X 4" retrospective. The Brattle is at 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | 617.876.6837.

The Harvard Film Archive's "The Film Experience: Existentialist Adaptations" series sounds pretty formidable, but tonight's late show, "THE BEATS," features existentialist adaptations by American Beat writers, and leading off is the more-friendly-sounding "Pull My Daisy," a 30-minute collaboration between Robert Frank and Alfred Leslie that's based on a play by Jack Kerouac and has Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, and Peter Orlovsky playing themselves, not to mention Delphine Seyrig (who would go on to star in L'année dernière à Marienbad - now that's existential) as the wife of a railroad brakeman played by Larry Rivers. There are also two shorts by San Francisco Beat poet Christopher Maclaine and two by the team of Anthony Balch and William S. Burroughs. It all starts at 9 pm in the Carpenter Center, 24 Quincy St, Cambridge | 6 pm | 617.495.4700.

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SUNDAY 15

FILM

The best film released in 2005 was made 30 years ago. In case you missed the brief re-release of Michelangelo Antonioni's The Passenger, in which Jack Nicholson plays a journalist who takes on the identity of a dead man, the Brattle Theatre is bringing it back this weekend to open its "ANTONIONI X 4" retrospective. The Brattle is at 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | 617.876.6837.

Perhaps among your New Year's resolutions you have included a desire to get to the bottom of this whole avant-garde-cinema thing. If so, the Harvard Film Archive's "Immaterial Monuments" series is the place to start, though for some the late Stan Brakhage's 250-minute ART OF VISION (1961-'65) might be the place they finish. Visually rapturous and utterly enigmatic, this exultant formal and mythic exercise includes the complete 1963 "cosmological epic" Dog Star Man. The HFA is in the Carpenter Center, 24 Quincy St, Cambridge | 6 pm | 617.495.4700. Mi and L'au

POP

You're not going crazy if listening to MI & L'AU causes a sudden yearning for a holiday in the snowy Nordic countryside - after meeting in L'au's native France and falling in love, the couple moved to an isolated cabin in the woods of Mi's native Finland, where they devoted themselves to making music together. (Sounds nice, doesn't it?) There they recorded the bulk of their homonymous debut - an album that's so gentle and spare it makes Nick Drake sound like Dream Theater - before finishing up in Brooklyn with the help of their Young God label mates Akron/Family and others. It'll be interesting to see how the hushed acoustic-guitar-string plucks and vocal coos translate live when they open for MILO JONES at P.A.'s Lounge, 345 Somerville Ave, Somerville | 617.776.1557.

CLASSICAL

"Every music organization in the city will celebrate Mozart's 250th birthday during the coming year," PRO ARTE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA writes, but only the Pro Arte can boast "the attendance of the direct descendants of Mozart's employer the Hieronymus Count Colloredo, Archbishop of Salzburg." We're impressed. In honor of the occasion, the Pro Arte has programmed Mozart's Serenade No. 4 (Colloredo), along with his Masonic Funeral Music and Piano Concerto No. 27, with Georgian pianist Alexander Korsantia. It's all at Harvard University's Sanders Theatre, in Memorial Hall, 45 Quincy St, Cambridge | 3 pm | $12-$48 | 617.661.7067.

HIP-HOP

No matter how often the '80s are referred to as hip-hop's golden age, the founding fathers are still going to sound dated to modern ears. But a live history lesson could probably do you some good, and tonight BIG DADDY KANE, one of the era's best rappers, is at the Roxy, 279 Tremont St, Boston | 617.338.ROXY.

LOCAL

It's time once again for the annual "MAXIE AWARDS," which means T MAX and the 'zine he's captained through three decades of Boston rock will be offering the Noise's picks for the best in town, along with a little music and talk from local luminaries like Wheeler and Dealer PAT MCGRATH, PETER MOORE, MICHELLE PAULHUS, and ROBBY ROADSTEAMER. It all happens upstairs at the Middle East, 472 Mass Ave, Cambridge | 1 pm | 617.864.EAST.

JAZZ

On the Zeitgeist Gallery calendar, ROBERT STILLMAN's Horses (Mill Pond) is billed as "rural instrumental songs," which is as good an explanation as any of its old-time mournful saxophone-and-rhythm sound. He's joined by fellow Brooklynites FLYING ("dream-pop-noise-folk") and locals SQUIDS ("undersea dance party") | 1353 Cambridge St, Cambridge | 617.876.6060.

FUNK

Despite their unfortunate name, BONERAMA are the real deal - a New Orleans street-style brass band where the brass is five trombones. They're at Harpers Ferry, 156 Brighton Ave, Allston | 617.254.9743.

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MONDAY 16

FILM

The Brattle Theatre continues its "ANTONIONI X 4" retrospective with Blow-Up (1966), in which Antonioni switches from the illusion of identity to the figment of objective reality as David Hemmings plays a fashion photographer who might - might - have snapped a picture of a murder. The Brattle is at 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | 617.876.6837.

PERFORMANCE

The bad news is that "A TRILOGY OF DREAMS," a musical tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. based on the works of poet Langston Hughes and performed by the Boston Children's Chorus, the Chicago Children's Choir, and the Young People's Chorus of New York City, is sold out. The good news is that it's being broadcast live at 7 pm on Channel 5 from New England Conservatory's Jordan Hall. Better still, you can still purchase tickets for the 1 pm dress rehearsal (and don't think for a minute that the kids will be mailing it in), which is also at Jordan Hall, 30 Gainsborough St, Boston | $5 | 617.585.1260.

ROCK

It was a haunting, dubbed-out cover of the White Stripes' "Seven Nation Army" along with a little teaser of an EP called Cash Machine (Necessary) that put the working-class Brit band HARD-FI in a prime position to steal the show at South by Southwest last year. Then it was back home, where their Specials-inflected debut full-length, Stars of CCTV (Necessary), climbed to #6 on the British charts. Their American label, Capitol, is still taking a cautious approach to breaking the band here: Stars of CCTV doesn't have a firm US release date. But the foursome are aiming to drum up some support with radio-station-sponsored shows like tonight's big gig downstairs at the Middle East. It's free with an FNX card, and you can get one at fnxradio.com | 480 Mass Ave, Cambridge | 617.864.EAST.

STREET MUSIC

Club Passim's annual "STREET PERFORMERS' NIGHT" to benefit the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter features Brian Webb, Ari, Ryan Alvanos, Lisa Houseman & Dave Falk, Mike Hastings, Eleanor Murray, Kevin So, Lloyd Thayer, Katrin, Tokyo Tramps, and Tom Bianchi | 47 Palmer St, Cambridge | 617.492.7679.

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TUESDAY 17

FILM

The Brattle Theatre continues its "ANTONIONI X 4" retrospective with Blow-Up (1966), in which Antonioni switches from the illusion of identity to the figment of objective reality as David Hemmings plays a fashion photographer who might - might - have snapped a picture of a murder. The Brattle is at 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | 617.876.6837.

BOOKS

We live in a era of fear, what with George W. waging a feckless war against terrorism, avian flu threatening to spread to humans, and nutritionists warning us that Americans are the world's fattest people. Perhaps we can take solace from Kathleen Ragan's OUTFOXING FEAR, a collection of folktales collected from around the globe. Ragan shares them at Newtonville Books, 296 Walnut St, Newton | 7:30 pm | free | 617.244.6619.

INDIE

New-York-by-way-of-DC's SUPERSYSTEM were all but lost among all the neo-new-wave talk last year. The former Dischord band, who once went by the name of El Guapo, have been toying with serrated dance grooves since 1996 while remaining more or less under the radar. But with a new drummer on board, they got down to the business of groove on the synth-driven indie-dance disc Always Never Again (Touch & Go) and came through with their most determined and cohesive collection yet. They're headlining upstairs at the Middle East with FRENCH TOAST, CERTAINLY, SIR, and SAN SERAC | 472 Mass Ave, Cambridge | 617.864.EAST.

ROCK

Former Meatpuppet Curt Kirkwood at the Paradise Lounge. Read Mikael Wood's review of Snow here.

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WEDNESDAY 18

INDIE

What would the Pixies sound like if Joey Santiago bought a delay pedal and Frank Black screamed less and let Kim Deal sing more? Maybe something like EYES LIKE KNIVES' debut full-length, 2004's Slow Distractions (Dopamine), an atmospheric blast of swirling harmony, spacy atmospherics, and haunting guy-girl vocals. Recently the band have simultaneously beefed up and stripped down their sound by adding hard-hitting new drummer Johnny Hunt, formerly of Favorite Atomic Hero, and cutting back on the big guitars in favor of understated single-string melodies and synth lines. They have a new, self-released four-song EP (which is available fo free download at myspace.com/eyeslikeknives) and a handful of other new tunes that they'll be laying down at Mark Vieira's weekly BlackOut Bar at Great Scott. Also on the bill are the Saddle Creek band CRITERIA, who're fronted by former Cursive guitarist Stephen Pedersen | 1222 Comm Ave, Allston | 617.734.4502

FILM

More from the "ANTONIONI X 4" series. Tonight, the vacationers in L'avventura (1960) search for a woman who vanishes on a volcanic Sicilian isle. The Brattle is at 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | 617.876.6837.

If Stan Brakhage's Art of Vision on Sunday merely whet your appetite for experimental cinema, take in today's "Immaterial Monuments" series selection at the HFA, Jonas Mekas's three-hour WALDEN (1969). The granddaddy of the American avant-garde, Mekas kept a cinema diary of the Manhattan art scene in the '60s, and among those included are his pals Andy Warhol, Ken Jacobs and, of course, Stan Brakhage. The HFA is in the Carpenter Center, 24 Quincy St, Cambridge | 7 pm | 617.495.4700.

BOOKS

Along with having great public schools and astronomical real-estate prices, Brookline is the birthplace of John F. Kennedy and the home of the Country Club, where in 1913 American Francis Ouimet won one of the most famous of US Opens. In VOICES OF BROOKLINE, Larry Ruttman delves into the town's history and the people who created it. You can hear about Mike Wallace, Lydia Shire, Michael Dukakis, Harry Ellis Dickson, and Liz Walker, and many more when Ruttman reads at Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St, Newton | 7:30 pm | free | 617.796.1360.

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THURSDAY 19

JAZZ

Still only in his late 20s, ROBERT GLASPER has been buzzed about on a number of counts. For one, he's the first new artist signed to Blue Note Records in æons. (His Canvas came out late last year.) For another, he has a tuneful voice as a composer and pianist that combines the gospel roots of his Houston upbringing, fluent jazz chops (gigs with Terence Blanchard and Roy Hargrove), and a taste for hip-hop (collaborations with Q-Tip and Mos Def). Lastly, his trio - with bassist Vincente Archer and drummer Damion Reid - have honed a mellow, one-of-a-kind ensemble sound. They're at Scullers, in the DoubleTree Guest Suites Hotel, 400 Soldiers Field Rd, Boston | 617.562.4111.

ROCK

The electro-rocking futuristic freaks of local sextet the CAMPAIGN FOR REAL-TIME spent more than a year distilling their notoriously delirious live show to tape. Yes . . . I Mean, No (Curve of the Earth), their debut full-length, has finally landed, and the band celebrate at Great Scott with funk-punk Boston expats MAD MAN FILMS, who recently relocated to Brooklyn | 1222 Comm Ave, Allston | 617.734.4502.

PROG

Prog-rock fans have the kind of evangelic fervor usually reserved for tent revivals, so maybe there'll be speaking in tongues at the Somerville Theatre when Yes bassist Chris Squire brings his reunited pre-Yes outfit the SYN to town. After all, it's taken nearly 40 years for the band, who're co-led by vocalist Steve Nardelli, to make their way from swinging London to Davis Square - and to record a second album, the recently released Syndestructible (Umbrello) | 55 Davis Square, Somerville | 8 pm | $30 | 617.931.2000. Zabriskie Point

FILM

The Brattle's "ANTONIONI X 4" series concludes with 1970's Zabriskie Point, in which hippies search for the lost '60s in Death Valley. That's at 40 Brattle St, Cambridge | 617.876.6837.

If your New Year's resolution was to watch more edifying films or more films with subtitles, this is a good time to start. The Harvard Film Archive's "SIXTH ANNUAL NEW FILMS FROM EUROPE" series opens today with veteran French director Philippe Garrel's LES AMANTS RÉGULIERS/ REGULAR LOVERS (2005), a three-hour homage to the lost illusions of May '68. The HFA is in the Carpenter Center, 24 Quincy St, Cambridge | 7 pm | 617.495.4700.

Meanwhile, the Coolidge Corner Theatre and the Museum of Fine Arts try to save the world with this year's edition of the HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL. The MFA starts it off tonight with Kim Longinotto & Florence Ayisi's SISTERS IN LAW (2005), a documentary about tough female barristers in Cameroon who take on the patriarchy. That's in the museum's Remis Auditorium, 465 Huntington Ave, Boston | 7:45 pm | 617.369.3907.

Six decades ago, THE SENATOR WAS INDISCREET; today he'd probably be serving his second term as president. Dumb but ambitious senator Melvin G. Ashton tries to obtain his party's presidential nomination by blackmailing the powers that be with his record of all their dirty tricks. Starring William Powell and Peter Lind Hayes, this prescient 1947 satire is playwright George S. Kaufman's sole directorial effort, and it's free at the South Boston Branch Library, 646 East Broadway | 6 pm | 617.268.0180.

POETRY

Call us provincial, but one thing we like about poet DAVID RIVARD's new Sugartown (Graywolf Press) are the observations of local life: a drunk at the bar of the Green Street Grill ("Give me another sin & tonic"): a "gay flambeur and blond BU coed" sunning themselves on the dock at the BU boathouse; a poem titled "The Rev. Larry Love Is Dead" ("his hair having been/hennaed free of charge/for one last time/by the Egyptian cosmetologists/at the Style Connection"). Rivard, a Tufts writing teacher and Cambridge resident, signs copies of Sugartown at the Harvard Book Store, 1256 Mass Ave, Cambridge | 6:30 pm | 617.661.1515.

COMEDY

EUGENE MIRMAN at the Palladium, Worcester. With Cake, Tegan and Sara, and Gogol Bordello.

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