Powered by Google
Home
Listings
Editors' Picks
News
Music
Movies
Food
Life
Arts + Books
Rec Room
Moonsigns
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Personals
Adult Personals
Classifieds
Adult Classifieds
- - - - - - - - - - - -
stuff@night
FNX Radio
Band Guide
MassWeb Printing
- - - - - - - - - - - -
About Us
Contact Us
Advertise With Us
Work For Us
Newsletter
RSS Feeds
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Webmaster
Archives



sponsored links
- - - - - - - - - - - - -
PassionShop.com
Sex Toys - Adult  DVDs - Sexy  Lingerie


 
  E-Mail This Article to a Friend
 

Various Artists
THE AMERICAN SONG-POEM CHRISTMAS
(Bar-None)
Stars graphics

The "song-poems" of the í60s and í70s ó in which Jane and John Q. Public, visions of stardom dancing in their heads, mailed their scribbled doggerel to a studio where session hacks put the lyrics to music in one take and mailed back a 45 rpm single ó represent a phenomenon by turns endearingly charming and appallingly tacky. Much like Christmas itself. But if a song poemís banged-out instrumentation typifies cynical commerce, its words are earnest self-expression, evincing a childlike guilelessness in grown-ups thatís apropos of the holidays. In "Santa Claus Goes Modern" (covered by "outsider art" fans Yo La Tengo for give-away at their annual Hanukkah eight-night stands), studio sirens "Bobbie Boyle and the Singers" croon to a listless Bacharach-Carpenters groove about a Saint Nick who trades up his sleigh for a flying saucer. Itís a different vehicle in "Santa Came on a Nuclear Missile," whose ominous sound effects and queasy í80s synths conjure Reagan-era paranoia about Xmas extinction. "Merry Christmas Polka" exhorts the faithful to "dance the night away . . . itís Christís birthday." (Santa, meanwhile, tosses back a couple cold ones.)

Then thereís "Daddy, Is Santa Really Six Foot Four?" and its dark intimations of murderous infidelity: "His deer must have been stuck in the snow, ícos, Daddy, he was driving a Monte Carlo," shrieks a painfully out-of-tune Tony Tennille wanna-be. "Is it true that he carries a torch for Momma ó and a gun for you?" But the beauty of the season is captured in "Snowbows," as a castrato John Denver type warbles slo-mo over goopy strings as if his eggnog had been spiked with psychotropics. "If rain can make a rainbow, with colors way up high, then snow can make a snowbow, youíll see them if you try." Somewhere, Santa and Baby Jesus are singing along.

BY MIKE MILIARD


Issue Date: December 26, 2003 - January 1, 2004
Back to the Music table of contents
  E-Mail This Article to a Friend
 









about the phoenix |  advertising info |  Webmaster |  work for us
Copyright © 2005 Phoenix Media/Communications Group