Powered by Google
Home
Listings
Editors' Picks
News
Music
Movies
Food
Life
Arts + Books
Rec Room
Moonsigns
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Personals
Adult Personals
Classifieds
Adult Classifieds
- - - - - - - - - - - -
stuff@night
FNX Radio
Band Guide
MassWeb Printing
- - - - - - - - - - - -
About Us
Contact Us
Advertise With Us
Work For Us
Newsletter
RSS Feeds
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Webmaster
Archives



sponsored links
- - - - - - - - - - - - -
PassionShop.com
Sex Toys - Adult  DVDs - Sexy  Lingerie


 
  E-Mail This Article to a Friend
 

Brad Mehldau Trio
ANYTHING GOES
(Warner Bros.)
Stars graphics

Well, not anything. For the past few years, pianist Mehldau has been slipping provocative new original pieces into his live trio performances, and none of those originals appears here. But the selection of covers is typically broad, from the Cole Porter title track to Radiohead. And you get what you pay for in a Mehldau trio set: the pianistís relaxed independence between right-hand lyrical melodic outpourings and left-hand rhythmic variety, his broad harmonic range, and the trioís overall rhythmic elasticity.

The opening "Get Happy" is typical: Mehldau grounds the piece in an off-kilter ostinato that recurs throughout the odd-meter arrangement, not taking off into high-velocity 4/4 swing until after a wide-ranging cadenza ó a full five minutes into this nearly-10-minute performance. Thatís a lot of tension before the release. Mehldau seems partial to Radiohead for the same quality of expectation created by suspended, static harmonies, but "Everything in Its Right Place" otherwise passes through without making an impression. Thereís more emotional payoff in Charlie Chaplinís "Smile," where another odd left-hand device counters the sunny melody with nagging rhythm and doubting dissonances. In a Jordan Hall concert a couple of seasons back, the trio sustained the rhythm of Osvaldo Farresís bolero "Tres Palabras" until the tension was almost unbearable. The reading here is less dramatic, but it gives you a feeling for Mehldauís ability to create the illusion of multiple voices ó of more than two hands. Paul Simonís "Still Crazy After All These Years" sounds downright hymnal, and Monkís "Skippy" is appropriately driving and linear.

BY JON GARELICK


Issue Date: March 26 - April 1, 2004
Back to the Music table of contents
  E-Mail This Article to a Friend
 









about the phoenix |  advertising info |  Webmaster |  work for us
Copyright © 2005 Phoenix Media/Communications Group