Powered by Google
Home
Listings
Editors' Picks
News
Music
Movies
Food
Life
Arts + Books
Rec Room
Moonsigns
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Personals
Adult Personals
Classifieds
Adult Classifieds
- - - - - - - - - - - -
stuff@night
FNX Radio
Band Guide
MassWeb Printing
- - - - - - - - - - - -
About Us
Contact Us
Advertise With Us
Work For Us
Newsletter
RSS Feeds
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Webmaster
Archives



sponsored links
- - - - - - - - - - - - -
PassionShop.com
Sex Toys - Adult  DVDs - Sexy  Lingerie


 
  E-Mail This Article to a Friend
 

Ada
BLONDIE
(Areal)

Late last year, some prominent rock critic with a bad case of year-end tokenism decided Blondie was "the electronic album of 2004," ostensibly because Kölnís Ada (a/k/a Michaela Dippel) covered rock songs by the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Everything But the Girl and maybe also because Ada is, you know, the whole "woman in a male-dominated genre" sort of thing. Problem is, the "Maps" cover ainít so hot, "Each and Everyone" was better as the instrumental "Blindhouse," and labelmate Basteroid supposedly does Adaís production. The albumís very good anyway. Ada is a songstress before sheís a track whore, willing to show her face with bright-eyed vocal melodies. She puts similarly plushy acts Superpitcher, Robag Wruhme, and Ulf Lohmann to shame all the more for it. Lush, prickly drones come easy to her, and the soft kick sounds and rounded treble squelches that pulse above and below them make for a truly distinct personality in a scene of notorious in-breeders. The first five tracks, particularly "The Red Shoes," with its toybox drills and puddling splatters, are perfect tech-house. And though the second half of Blondie never recovers the discís initial momentum, I was lying above about the "Maps" cover ó itís actually great.

BY NICK SYLVESTER


Issue Date: March 11 - 17, 2005
Back to the Music table of contents
  E-Mail This Article to a Friend
 









about the phoenix |  advertising info |  Webmaster |  work for us
Copyright © 2005 Phoenix Media/Communications Group